AndarLucia Magazine

A delicious recipe plus What you wanted to know about Sherry

Iberico stew with oranges

Tekst: Carin Leenders de Vries | culinary specialist

My passion for food started as a child, my parents always cooked with the best ingredients and they loved the different kitchens of the world. So at a very young age I tasted the Spanish flavours, and when I was in my mid-twenties gave my first Tapas y Jerez workshop!

My passion for Spain blossomed; years later I even became a sherry-educator! The smell, the taste and the history of these beautiful wines makes me smile always. Para siempre!!!

 

Iberico stew with vegetables and orange

Recipe for 6

 

When serving this dish I always serve it with a glass of wine which I filled out of sight, people than ask me what kind of wine I serve. I tell them: ‘ it’s a Jerez wine’ and when they taste it they never belief that it is sherry!! So you see it’s such a party when serving Viños de Jerez ;)

 

Ingredients

 

1.2 kg Iberico neck (sucade)

1 dl Amontillado

salt & pepper

1 tablespoon ground coriander seed

2 oranges

2 cloves of garlic

1 celeriac (800g)

800 g winter carrots

150 g butter

2 tablespoons oil

4 anchovy fillets

2 dl vegetable broth

 

How to prepare?

 

  • Marinate the Iberico for 1 hour, sprinkled with salt, pepper and ground coriander in the amontillado.  

  • Cut the vegetables into wide strips and fry them in 75 g golden brown butter for 5 minutes, let them cool.  

  • Cut the oranges in thick slices.  

  • Melt 75 g butter together with the oil and when golden brown bake the meat on each site till brown, take it out of the pan, put the orange slice on the bottom, turn them twice and than add the anchovy and broth. Place the meat on top, put the lid on the pan and let it simmer for 3 hours.  

  • Add the vegetables the last 30 minutes.  

  • Serve with potato parsnip puree where a beurre noisette is added to taste and a glass of Amontillado wine 

 

 

DO. Jerez in Spain is the oldest wine domain in the world. It has a total area of ​​vineyards of 10,500 hectares and is located in the famous triangle, El Puerto de Santa Maria, Jerez and San Lucar.

 

The sherry wine owes its name to a corruption of Jerez, officially Jerez de la Frontera, a city in southern Spain, which was founded around a thousand years before the beginning of our era, when Xera was founded by the Phoenicians. Depending on the language in which the term is used, the drink is called Jerez, Xeres or Sherry.

The name Jerez stands for 3000 years of wine history in the south of Spain. During that time the area name changed constantly. Around 700 BC the Phoenicians called it Xera. The Romans, who from about 200 BC were in service, spoke of Ceret. More than 600 years later, it was Vici Goths who spoke of Seritum. The Moors, who ruled the area from the beginning of the eighth century until around 1300, called it Sherish and after the Spanish recapture of Spain it became Xeres

 

Of course Jerez de la Frontera is still part of what is called the sherry area, a triangular area in the province of Andalucia with the cities of Jerez, El Puerto de Santa Maria and Sanlucar de Barrameda. Only wines that come from that area - and which moreover meet a number of other strict conditions and standards - may be called Jerez, Xeres or sherry by the Regulatory Council.

 

So many people wrongly still only talk about sherry, as if it were one wine. The truth is much nicer. Sherry has a much larger variety. The most drunk sherry types are the Fino, the Manzanilla, the Amontillado, the Oloroso and the Pedro Ximenez.

How can you roughly describe the distinctive flavors?

Fino is the somewhat dry, slightly tinted wine from the interior of the sherry region. It is delicate and delicate in taste.

The Manzanilla, actually also a fino, comes exclusively from Sanlucar de Barrameda. Due to the influence of the sea, these wines develop differently from the finos from the warmer and drier interior. Manzanilla has a delicate, slightly salty taste. Fino and Manzanilla are perfect aperitif wines and also taste good in combination with tapas, new herring, shellfish, smoked fish, poached fish with a crisp sauce, sushi and caviar.

The Amontillado is an older finotype, with more alcohol and color and the characteristic smell of hazelnuts. Its fine bitter taste is similar to the taste of almonds. It goes well with soup, white meat or mature cheese, pâté, eel, spicy and smoked meats.

The Oloroso is naturally a dry, fairly dark-colored sherry with a powerful bouquet and a strong taste. It is particularly suitable as a companion of spicy soups and spicy dishes of white meat and poultry. The sweeter variant - made by adding sweet wine to the dry olorose - is very tasty with desserts.

Many people swear by the Cream sherry. That is an Oloroso that has been sweetened with a good dose of sweet wine from the Moscatel or Pedro Ximenez grape. It tastes great with desserts, blue-veined cheeses and fruit salads.

Finally, there is the Pedro Ximenez, and very sweet wine with an exceptionally lush character made from the Pedro Ximénez grape. After harvesting, these grapes are first allowed to dry in the hot sun for a few weeks, with the result that the grapes have a high sugar content. The PX fits perfectly with chocolate, fruit or ice cream desserts.

 

Sherry is traditionally drunk in the tapered "copita", the sherry glass par excellence. But a normal wine glass works even better for me.

Like other wines, it is wise to keep opened bottles for no longer than a few days. Delicate wines such as Fino and Manzanilla in particular quickly lose their freshness. And lets be honest, when drinking white wine we finish the bottle within a day ;)My passion for food started as a child, my parents always cooked with the best ingredients and they loved the different kitchens of the world. So at a very young age I tasted the Spanish flavours, and when I was in my mid-twenties gave my first Tapas y Jerez workshop!

My passion for Spain blossomed; years later I even became a sherry-educator! The smell, the taste and the history of these beautiful wines makes me smile always. Para siempre!!!

 

Iberico stew with vegetables and orange

Recipe for 6

 

When serving this dish I always serve it with a glass of wine which I filled out of sight, people than ask me what kind of wine I serve. I tell them; ‘ it’s a Jerez wine’ and when they taste it they never belief that it is sherry!! So you see it’s such a party when serving Viños de Jerez ;)

 

 

Ingredients;

 

1.2 kg Iberico neck (sucade)

1 dl Amontillado

salt & pepper

1 tablespoon ground coriander seed

2 oranges

2 cloves of garlic

1 celeriac (800g)

800 g winter carrots

150 g butter

2 tablespoons oil

4 anchovy fillets

2 dl vegetable broth

 

How to prepare;

 

  •     Marinate the Iberico for 1 hour, sprinkled with salt, pepper and ground coriander in the amontillado.  

  •     Cut the vegetables into wide strips and fry them in 75 g golden brown butter for 5 minutes, let them cool.  

  •     Cut the oranges in thick slices.  

  •     Melt 75 g butter together with the oil and when golden brown bake the meat on each site till brown, take it out of the pan, put the orange slice on the bottom, turn them twice and than add the anchovy and broth. Place the meat on top, put the lid on the pan and let it simmer for 3 hours.  

  •     Add the vegetables the last 30 minutes.  

  •     Serve with potato parsnip puree where a beurre noisette is added to taste and a glass of Amontillado wine 

 

 

DO. Jerez in Spain is the oldest wine domain in the world. It has a total area of ​​vineyards of 10,500 hectares and is located in the famous triangle, El Puerto de Santa Maria, Jerez and San Lucar.

 

The sherry wine owes its name to a corruption of Jerze, officially Jerez de la Frontera, a city in southern Spain, which was founded around a thousand years before the beginning of our era, when Xera was founded by the Phoenicians. Depending on the language in which the term is used, the drink is called Jerez, Xeres or Sherry.

The name Jerez stands for 3000 years of wine history in the south of Spain. During that time the area name changed constantly. Around 700 BC the Phoenicians called it Xera. The Romans, who from about 200 BC were in service, spoke of Ceret. More than 600 years later, it was Vici Goths who spoke of Seritum. The Moors, who ruled the area from the beginning of the eighth century until around 1300, called it Sherish and after the Spanish recapture of Spain it became Xeres

 

Of course Jerez de la Frontera is still part of what is called the sherry area, a triangular area in the province of Andalucia with the cities of Jerez, El Puerto de Santa Maria and Sanlucar de Barrameda. Only wines that come from that area - and which moreover meet a number of other strict conditions and standards - may be called Jerez, Xeres or sherry by the Regulatory Council.

 

So many people wrongly still only talk about sherry, as if it were one wine. The truth is much nicer. Sherry has a much larger variety. The most drunk sherry types are the Fino, the Manzanilla, the Amontillado, the Oloroso and the Pedro Ximenez.

How can you roughly describe the distinctive flavors?

Fino is the somewhat dry, slightly tinted wine from the interior of the sherry region. It is delicate and delicate in taste. The Manzanilla, actually also a fino, comes exclusively from Sanlucar de Barrameda. Due to the influence of the sea, these wines develop differently from the finos from the warmer and drier interior. Manzanilla has a delicate, slightly salty taste. Fino and manzanilla are perfect aperitif wines and also taste good in combination with tapas, new herring, shellfish, smoked fish, poached fish with a crisp sauce, sushi and caviar.

The Amontillado is an older finotype, with more alcohol and color and the characteristic smell of hazelnuts. Its fine bitter taste is similar to the taste of almonds. It goes well with soup, white meat or mature cheese, pâté, eel, spicy and smoked meats.

The Oloroso is naturally a dry, fairly dark-colored sherry with a powerful bouquet and a strong taste. It is particularly suitable as a companion of spicy soups and spicy dishes of white meat and poultry. The sweeter variant - made by adding sweet wine to the dry olorose - is very tasty with desserts.

Many people swear by the Cream sherry. That is an Oloroso that has been sweetened with a good dose of sweet wine from the Moscatel or Pedro Ximenez grape. It tastes great with desserts, blue-veined cheeses and fruit salads.

Finally, there is the Pedro Ximenez, and very sweet wine with an exceptionally lush character made from the Pedro Ximénez grape. After harvesting, these grapes are first allowed to dry in the hot sun for a few weeks, with the result that the grapes have a high sugar content. The PX fits perfectly with chocolate, fruit or ice cream desserts.

 

Sherry is traditionally drunk in the tapered "copita", the sherry glass par excellence. But a normal wine glass works even better for me.

Like other wines, it is wise to keep opened bottles for no longer than a few days. Delicate wines such as Fino and Manzanilla in particular quickly lose their freshness. And lets be honest, when drinking white wine we finish the bottle within a day ;)

Klassieke wijn 

 

Sherry is een wijn met een zodanig uitgesproken karakter en met een smaak zo rijk aan subtiele nuances dat hij samen met Rioja terecht te boek staat als Spanje's bekendste wijn. 

Voor alle zekerheid even de essentiële kenmerken: afkomstig uit Andalusië, gekarakteriseerd door het strikt lokale verschijnsel flor (spontane vorming van een conserverend gistdeken), lichtjes met alcohol versterkt en vervolgens langdurig oxidatief opgevoed. En in zijn oervorm zo droog als maar kan. Knisperend droog, zoals dat zo mooi heet. Sherry zou daarom eigenlijk geen aanbeveling nodig moeten hebben. Want zeg nu zelf, welke wijn biedt zo veel klasse voor zo’n beschaafde prijs? Maar hoe kan het dan dat zo'n uniek wijntype zo'n bedenkelijke reputatie heeft gekregen? Tsja, dat had natuurlijk alles te maken met de jacht op het grote geld.

De producenten in Jerez hebben inmiddels door schade en schande geleerd dat concessies aan het grote publiek, en daarmee aan de kwaliteit, wel kortstondig succes opleverden, maar op langere termijn bijna de ondergang voor sherry hadden betekend. Het parool is tegenwoordig: terug naar de basis. Beter in plaats van meer en met de nadruk op het droge oertype Fino. Op 'echte' vino de Jerez dus. Sherry zoals sherry bedoeld is. 

Grote traditie

 

Sherry is terecht een ‘klassieke wijn’. Vanwege bijzondere zaken als de floren het solera-systeem. En vanwege z’n herkomstgebied. Wanneer je in Jerez komt - makkelijk te bereiken vanuit Sevilla, voor zover nog een alibi nodig - overvalt je dat aha-gevoel dat alles te maken heeft met de bijzondere sfeer van de stad en z’n gigantische, kathedraalachtige bodegas. Trefwoorden: stijl en heuse traditie. 

Jerez staat voor raffinement, cultuur, historie, paleizen, tuinen, paarden en…wijn. En kom aan, laten we hier ook maar de schoonheid van de Andalusische vrouwen aan toevoegen. Kom je aan de buitenkant van de stad, dan zie je het andere gezicht van Jerez in de vorm van moderne bedrijfsgebouwen uit beton en staal. In de dagelijkse praktijk vertoont de sherryproductie industriële trekjes. En er is ook nog zoiets als functionaliteit. Ga je de stad helemaal uit, dan moet je, verrassend genoeg, de beroemde pagos, de wijngaarden, echt zoeken. Eigenlijk is dat wel een goed teken. Beperking en meesterschap blijken in Jerez nauw samen te hangen.

Grenzen aan de groei

 

Een paar honderd jaar lang ontwikkelde de sherryproductie zich op een tamelijk geleidelijke manier, tot ver in de 20e eeuw. In de jaren ’70 was er sprake van een ongekende boom. Het grote publiek in Groot-Brittanië en Nederland, dat z’n eerste wankele schreden op wijngebied zette, had sherry ontdekt. Althans, sherryachtige wijn, bij voorkeur met een zoetje en vooral goedkoop. Concessies aan deze belangrijke exportmarkten waren snel gemaakt met allesbehalve traditionele, aangezoete 'exportstijlen'. Men voorzag een spectaculaire stijging voor de jaren ’80 en zaken doen is ambitieus vooruitzien, dus begon men aan een grootschalige uitbreiding van wijngaarden en voorraden ten behoeve van de solera-rijping, een proces dat tijd vraagt. Minpuntje: de nieuwe wijngaarden werden noodgedwongen aangeplant in tweederangs terroirs. Maar wat dan nog? ‘Men’ zou de tweederangs wijn toch wel drinken. Zo leek het althans. En toen, begin jaren ’80 stokte de vraag ineens. Waar gerekend was op een mondiale vraag van 240 miljoen flessen, stagneerde de afzet op 190 miljoen om even later te dalen tot nog maar 150 miljoen. En voor de liefhebbers van actuele cijfers: in 2005 werd nog maar 115 miljoen liter geëxporteerd. 

Overcapaciteit was zodoende een levensgroot probleem geworden. Van een eerste herstelplan in de jaren ’80 kwam weinig terecht. De nood was kennelijk nog niet hoog genoeg, men modderde van kwaad tot erger. Eind jaren ’80 kwamen de Jerezanen eindelijk tot het inzicht dat het zo niet verder kon. Het aanbod was dramatisch veel groter dan de vraag. Een eventuele dumping onder kostprijs zou leiden tot de ondergang van de nodige producenten. 

Minder maar beter

 

De Associación de Criadores Exportadores de Sherry gaf daarom het organisatiebureau Price Waterhouse opdracht om de situatie in kaart te brengen en om met aanbevelingen voor een gezonde bedrijfsvoering in de toekomst te komen. Dat hebben ze geweten! De uitkomsten van de studie, die begin jaren ’90 werd uitgevoerd, logen er niet om: alleen een onmiddellijke, forse inkrimping van productie en voorraden zonder mitsen en maren bood kans op overleven. De totale oppervlakte van de wijngaarden met recht op de status van denominación de origen (DO) moest worden gereduceerd tot 13.000 hectare, een inkrimping met ruim 4.000 hectare. Op dit moment telt de DO Jerez nog maar 10.000 hectare. 

 

De inkrimping is volledig gerealiseerd in de perifere gemeenten met tweederangs terroirs, die met zand- of kleibodems, buiten het kerngebied Jerez Superior. Het areaal binnen Jerez Superior is daarentegen iets uitgebreid. Alleen daar zijn de eersteklas albarizas te vinden, de spierwitte, sterk kalkhoudende en water absorberende leembodems, die de beste druiven/wijnen opleveren. Andere maatregelen in het kader van het Strategisch Plan waren een beperking van de opbrengst, quotering voor de hoeveelheid wijn die door iedere bodegaper campagnejaar in de handel gebracht mag worden, reductie van de voorraden met een kwart, verbod op export in bulk, verplichte botteling in de streek zelf, een geleide prijspolitiek voor transacties met druiven en most en een sterk op educatie gerichte promotiecampagne om het geschonden imago te herstellen. 

Productinnovatie

 

Het is in Jerez gelukkig niet alleen bij maatregelen van louter marktregulerende aard gebleven.  Ook aan de wijn zelf is het nodige verbeterd. Tal van bodegashebben zich de afgelopen jaren intensief met kwaliteitsonderzoek beziggehouden, waarbij met name zaken als de hygiëne binnen het productieproces en het weren van zuurstof bij gevoelige types als Fino en Manzanilla centraal stonden. Een en ander heeft geleid tot een steeds verdere verlaging van het alcoholgehalte, nu nog maar 15 à 15,5%. Èn tot de invoering van de schroefdop! Jerez was daarin een voorloper. Vergeet trouwens al die Engelse termen als medium sherry maar, Jerez is een Spaanse wijn met eigen type-aanduidingen. 

 

Oneindige variatie

 

De variatie in vinos de Jerez is eindeloos. Het gaat dan niet zo zeer om banale verschillen zoals je die bij gewone wijn vindt, met rood versus wit, staal en hout en zo meer. Nee, het gaat vooral om subtiele nuances. Variaties op één thema. Met uitzondering van de zoete varianten op basis van de pedro ximénez- en moscatel-druif komen alle sherry-wijnen van een en dezelfde druif, de palomino fino. De tweede constante is de vorming van de gistdeken, de flor. Toegegeven, je kunt in Jerez onwaarschijnlijk fraaie sherry’s vinden die geen flor-karakter meer hebben (Amontillado, een geoxideerde Fino) of nooit gehad hebben (Oloroso), maar de sherry der sherry’s is voor mij die van het type Fino, die met de flor. In één adem moet dan ook de nauw verwante Manzanilla genoemd worden, de Fino uit Sanlúcar de Barrameda, een wijn met een eigen herkomstbenaming. En kom je bij de producenten in El Puerto de Santa Maria, dan zal men je er daar fijntjes op wijzen dat er ook zoiets bestaat als een Fino del Puerto, qua stijl ergens halverwege een Fino uit Jerez en een Manzanilla uit Sanlúcar. 

 

Naast de nuances als gevolg van de plaats van rijping, draagt ook de stijl van de huizen bij aan de verrassend grote variatie tussen de afzonderlijke wijnen. En dan gaat het alleen nog maar om wat je als 'standaardwijnen' zou mogen beschouwen. Jerez heeft namelijk ook nog de nodige specialiteiten te bieden, kleinschalig geproduceerde wijnen. 

Voorbeelden van dergelijke wijnen zijn die van het zeldzame type Palo Cortado (die het midden houdt tussen een Amontillado en een Oloroso), nog zeldzamere añadas(vintage sherry’s), almacenistasafkomstig van individuele ‘opvoeders’, en niet te vergeten de rare sherriesmet een solera van tientallen jaren, die het predikaat VOS of VORS dragen. Die afkortingen staan niet voor dieren, maar respectievelijk voor Very Old Sherry en Very Old Rare Sherry, met respectievelijk een gemiddelde leeftijd van minimaal 20 en minimaal 30 jaar. Voor wie iets 'filmends' zoekt is er tenslotte de rijke, intens zoete Pedro Ximénez of ook wel afgekort PX genoemd. 

Fino da tavola’ – sherry aan tafel 

 

Sherry heeft de naam alleen maar geschikt te zijn als aperitief, maar het is tegelijkertijd ook een perfecte wijn om aan tafel te drinken. Net als champagne. Fino en Manzanilla hebben een behoorlijk hoge doordrinkfactor, te meer omdat het alcoholpercentage tegenwoordig omlaag gebracht is. Het fenomeen tapaslaat zien hoe goed een Fino bij eten past. Of ga eens in Sanlúcar de Barrameda fruits de mer of gebakken vis eten met een net zo verse Manzanilla erbij. Goddelijk! 

Nog even over versheid van de Fino of Manzanilla gesproken, voor deze beide relatief lichte wijnen geldt dat versheid van essentieel belang is; flessen die open staan oxideren vrij snel en verliezen dan hun typisch levendige karakter. En waarom zou je ze in vredesnaam niet in één keer leegdrinken? Dat doe je uiteindelijk ook met een ‘gewone’ witte wijn!

 

 

Men neme…

 

Vino de Jerez heeft een verleidelijke doordrinkfactor en is daarom heel geschikt als maaltijdbegeleider. Enige uitzondering hierop is de ongewoon rijke, intens zoete PX. In feite past vrijwel alles. Onderstaand wat suggesties voor combinaties. 

Fino en Manzanilla – koel geserveerd als aperitief, als begeleider van tapas,jabugoham, soepen, schaal- en schelpdieren (denk aan langoustines of mosselen), vis (van nieuwe haring tot gerookte paling), milde harde kazen (Manchego).

Amontillado – wit vlees, vette vis, gerijpte kazen, meditatiewijn

Oloroso – wild, rood vlees, of bij een milde Havannasigaar 

Pedro Ximénez – chocoladedesserts, gebak, blauwschimmelkazen

 

 

Palomino, alias…

 

De wijngaarden van Jerez mogen dan wel in overgrote meerderheid beplant zijn met slechts één enkel druivenras, de palomino fino, het aantal synoniemen voor deze druif is indrukwekkend. Een kleine greep: albán, albar, horgazuela, jerez, jerez fina, listán, palomino de Chipiona, palomino de pinchito…

Op het etiket kom je deze namen overigens nooit tegen. Het enige dat daarop telt is de naam van het herkomstgebied, Jerez! We love you!!